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Author Topic: Understanding Channel usage  (Read 453 times)

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Offline dimitry

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Understanding Channel usage
« on: November 30, 2016, 05:54:44 AM »
Hi All,

This may be some basic question . But I have to get it clarified .

We normally receive a call to our DMS 100 and CS2K switch from a 0800 number.  Customer dials 0800 and the PCD distributes as configured in Call plan to any of the two switch.  Assume the call has come Nortel CS2K switch . This call is then routed to an IVR and customer is in IVR now.  It is a PSTN TDM call .

Can I say now one channel in my trunk is in use now ?

Later the call gets blind transferred to an agent in the same switch.  Now how much channel are in use ? Is it still only one channel ?


In same way when instead of IVR transferring it to an agent it transfers it to an 0800 number that is in the PSTN cloud .  Now in this case how many channel is being used . Could you please explain?


Offline Michael McNamara

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Re: Understanding Channel usage
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2017, 09:21:33 AM »
Welcome to the forums...

This is referred to as tromboning. you can read more about anti-tromboning here.

This is going to depend greatly on your hardware and your configuration. So I can't provide an exact answer for you, you could certainly run a test and trace the call to see if it's pinning up multiple channels.

The rule of thumb... if the call terminates on your system and then leaves your system again, it will be tromboned. If the call hasn't received answer supervision it can be routed through the network or pulled back to the origin point for re-routing.

Good Luck!
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