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Author Topic: Connecting via Console  (Read 69211 times)

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Offline buntone

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Re: Connecting via Console
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2011, 02:08:15 PM »
Got it finally. Used the pinout in the manuals to make my own cable. This next question is kinda unrelated but... Does anyone know if it is possible to add a non Nortel Switch into the stack?


Offline Flintstone

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Re: Connecting via Console
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2011, 02:34:50 PM »
Hi,

Glad you got your console sorted.

The best way to add a non Nortel switch to a stack is to create an 802.1Q trunk using two or more ports in an MLT trunk and use Etherchannel if the other switch for example is a Cisco switch?

CheerZ and good luck

Offline buntone

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Re: Connecting via Console
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2011, 02:50:35 PM »
The other switch is a Dell powerconnect 6248, if that helps.

Offline semert

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Re: Connecting via Console
« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2011, 02:55:34 PM »
Dell also support 802.1Q VLAN tagging.  I believe it also supports LACP link aggregation groups.

You can only "stack" within the product family (4500 to 4500, 5500 or 5600 to 5500, etc.).  You can't stack between product families nor between vendors.  Stacking implies that you are extending a connection between switches to essentially make them act as a single switch, just spread out across multiple boxes.

But as pointed out, you can connect them.  Use a high speed link (gig copper, 10Gig copper or fiber if appropriate) and extend the VLANs between them via 802.1Q VLAN Tagging.  If you want more bandwidth between the Dell and the Avaya switch, create a LACP LAG and trunk multiple ports together for more aggregate bandwidth.

Offline buntone

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Re: Connecting via Console
« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2011, 04:15:39 PM »
Sorry, I am new to this stuff. I am an intern at the company and they just checked this on me to do. We are trying to get more bandwith between the server racks and one of the racks is using a Dell Powerconnect 6248 switch and the other racks all have Nortel 5510-48T switches. Could you maybe point me to documents on how to do this or explain in more detail? Thanks.

Offline Michael McNamara

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Re: Connecting via Console
« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2011, 06:35:42 PM »
This isn't something you should just "take on" unless you have a testlab or your willing to experiment with your production network. You can easily take down the whole network.

With that said you can find an example of how to trunk an Avaya Ethernet Routing Switch and a Cisco Catalyst here;
http://blog.michaelfmcnamara.com/2011/01/802-1q-vlan-tagging-on-a-cisco-catalyst-3750-e/

I the link is 1000Mbps I would strongly suggest you examine the port statistics to determine if you really need additional bandwidth and that your limiter isn't somewhere else.

Good Luck!
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Offline notanic

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Re: Connecting via Console - my solution
« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2015, 11:24:30 PM »
Hi,

I had this same problem, so I just wanted to document my solution.

The problem is that for some reason Nortel switches want a 'straight through' connection not a rollover.
Standard Cisco console cable is a rollover.

What it needs is a straight through cable.

The difference:
google = rollover cable pinout
google = straight through cable pinout

Anyway what I did is:

Connect a standard USB to serial adapter to a DB9 to RJ45 adapter, then a standard Ethernet patch cable, then another DB9 to RJ45 adapter then plugged into the Nortel console port.

If I didn't have the DB9 to RJ45 adapter, I would have just cut open a rollover cable and connect the wires in a straight  through way, i.e pin 1 connect to pin 9 etc.

Hope google finds this.

Picture attached.

Chris








Offline TankII

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Re: Connecting via Console
« Reply #22 on: September 21, 2015, 09:22:49 AM »
FYI, Brocade TI and FCX cables work fine on Avaya.
TankII