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Author Topic: Non-LACP bonding on 5510?  (Read 1817 times)

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Offline spatil

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Non-LACP bonding on 5510?
« on: December 06, 2014, 11:08:48 AM »
I have a server with two gigabit ports, and I'd like to bond them to get a ~2Gbps interface.

In the HP ProCurve I use for another project, I found an option to bond ports without using LACP. My understanding is that LACP is for increasing the number of maxed-bandwidth connections to a machine, while non-LACP trunking would allow me to create a single interface with approximately double the bandwidth of the two bonded interfaces.

I can't find any options on the 5510 to bond the interfaces without using LACP. I don't think MLT is what I need to use, but I could be wrong.

I'm very new to this switch, and to networking in general, so I'm not sure what I'm doing. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!


Offline TankII

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Re: Non-LACP bonding on 5510?
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2014, 09:07:18 AM »
MLT is what you want to use.  It is the equivalent to a static Gigabit EtherChannel trunk in the Cisco world.
The only stipulation is all the ports must be the same speed.

TankII

Offline spatil

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Re: Non-LACP bonding on 5510?
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2014, 09:36:30 PM »
Thanks! I will try it out soon.

Offline Michael McNamara

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Re: Non-LACP bonding on 5510?
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2014, 05:30:51 PM »
Quote
"a single interface with approximately double the bandwidth of the two bonded interfaces"

This isn't technically correct... whether it's static or LACP the distribution of frames will only allow a single conversation between two IP endpoints to utilize a single path even though there are two paths available. You would need to use ECMP to load balance every other packet between both available paths.

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