• September 21, 2018, 08:46:08 AM
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register. Registration is free.
Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: ERS 5952GTS-PWR+  (Read 2072 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Telair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 963
ERS 5952GTS-PWR+
« on: June 05, 2016, 09:12:14 PM »
Yay!  Finally got my hands on some ERS 5900's, specifically the ERS 5952GTS-PWR+.  We are staging over a thousand of these switches for a client, so I have gotten to know them a bit.

To build a 5900 switch, first they are a lot more work than the 5500 in terms of getting them working.  Where as with a 5500 you just take it out of the box and plug it in.  With the 5900's you have a number of separate boxes now that you have to assemble.  One box is the main unit and rack braces.  One box is the fans for the unit that you have to screw on to the back.  The fans can be either back to front or front to back airflow, so make sure you order the right ones.  Then there is another one box for the power supply or two boxes for the power supplies if you ordered the second power supply option.  They are nice in that they just slide in and lock in the main unit.  No tools required.  Then you get another box with the 0.5m stacking cable which I have to say is a pretty snug fit to connect to the next unit.  If you have a stack larger than say 3 units, I would order the longer 1m stack cable for the return connection from the bottom back to the top unit.

All together it takes about 10 minutes per unit to unpack everything and bolt it all together in to a stack.  Then when it's all connected up, power it all on.  Now if your lucky all your 5900's will have the same code out of the factory.  If not, you get to wait while the base unit changes the code on up to two switches at a time in the stack till they all agree with the base.  This seem to take about 5 minutes per pair of switches.  In the one case the base unit was a higher rev than the others in the stack of 8 switches.  So the base upgrades the two units closest to it.  The base upgrades units 2&8, then 3&7, then 4&6 and last 5.  All told, it took 20 minutes for the stack to be happy and then you have to go in and change the unit numbers to the right sequence since they got messed up with the automatic code upgrades.

Last main item is code upgrades.  Upgrading is exactly like it was with 5500's with the exception of a PoE image file that you may need if upgrading to v7.1.  So budget time for that extra reboot.  They have a nice USB port to plug a USB stick in to now.  Upgrading seemed to take the same amount of time to transfer the code and flash the units regardless of if you used TFTP or USB.  Still about 5 minutes to upgrade the code on the stack and reboot.

So just some initial thoughts and findings about the new switches.  They take some work to put together all the parts and pieces, but run really quiet as long as it's not too hot.


Offline Charles

  • Rookie
  • **
  • Posts: 15
Re: ERS 5952GTS-PWR+
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2016, 03:14:23 PM »
Really nice write up, I've been looking at both them and the 4900 series for replacing my edge switches (5600 series) in the very near future (about 2 years out).  Have you done anything with the OOBM port on the switch?

Offline Telair

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 963
Re: ERS 5952GTS-PWR+
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2016, 03:38:05 PM »
I still like the 5600 line a lot, but yeah it is aging out slowly but surely.  I have a few closets full with 5632's, 5650's and 5698's.  The 5900's are a very nice replacement unit for any 5000 series deployment.  I wouldn't have an issue replacing an ERS 5600 install with a 4900 or 5900.  Plus you can still change over a ERS 4900 to be a VSP 4900 later if you want.  The PoE+ abilities on the newer switches is great for the new wireless 802.11a/b/g/n/ac access points that need more power than my old 5520's can push out.  There is even a 5900 that can push 60 watts to run things like multimedia displays and signage.  I am a bit leary of pushing that much power through Ethernet cable.  Even Cisco warns against trying to move more than 50 watts through a cable as they actually start heating up.

I guess the only weakness I have found in the new 4900's and 5900's is that their stacking speed isn't up to what the 5600 line can do.  All the new switches use 2x 40Gb/sec QSFP's as their stacking ports.  While I am sure using standard gear lowers cost, it doesn't match up against the 5600's 144Gb/sec stacking speed.

As to the OOB port.  I have not tried it yet.  But the release notes all say it should be working happily.  Maybe next week I'll see if I can play with it.  It should be IPv4 and IPv6 addressable now for future-proofing.