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Extreme / Avaya / Nortel => Extreme / Avaya / Nortel Ethernet Switching => Topic started by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 10:29:16 AM

Title: Connecting via Console
Post by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 10:29:16 AM
I am having issues connecting Nortel Baystack 5510-48T ethernet switches via console cable. I do not have the IP address of the switches so connecting to them that way is not an option. I have read the posts and tried all of the options there but I still cannot get any response from the switch and nothing shows up in the terminal window. I am using hyperterminal with a straight console cable. Any help would be much appreciated.
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: jbfuzier on June 15, 2011, 11:06:35 AM
Have you configured your hyperterminal at 9600 bauds 8N1 ? (no Hw control)

Also does your cable works with another switch? If not, try to crossover RX and TX...
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 11:10:08 AM
Yes it is configured per the specs in the documentation. I have tried the crossover as well. The cable I am using has worked with other devices so it is a known good cable. I have tried it on all of the nortel switches but it still does not work. Any other ideas?
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Michael McNamara on June 15, 2011, 11:20:45 AM
With a straight-thru cable and your terminal emulator set at 9600-8-N-1 you should get the menu by hitting Ctrl-Y. Short of that you can power cycle the switch and you should see it boot on the console.

Good Luck!
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Flintstone on June 15, 2011, 11:21:44 AM
Hi buntone and welcome to the forum,

If 'CNTL-Y' doesn't work, have you tried to reboot the switch/stack so that you can see the boot up details in the console.  If you are not seeing anything in the console when rebooting then your console cable is incorrect?

CheerZ and good luck
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Dominik on June 15, 2011, 11:23:26 AM
You need a straight srial cable for your ERS5510.
As jbfuzier mentioned with 9600 bauds with Data Bits 8, Stop Bits 1 Parity None, Flow Control None.

Try to press Ctrl Y , sometimes you can not see the banner.
It is possible to change the console settings, so maybe the baud rate was configured on your switch to a different value.

If nothing helps you can reset the ERS5510 with the UI Button (white Button with blue Nortel Logo on the left side of the switch front)

Here are the steps you need to do:

Press the UI button and hold it for eight seconds.
The color and status of the Pwr LED turns amber, slow blinking to
indicate that the system will reset in less than three seconds. To stop
the reset, release the UI button.
The color and status of the Pwr LED turns amber, with fast blinking
to indicate that the system will reset in less than one second. To stop
the reset, release the UI button.

Godd Luck

Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Flintstone on June 15, 2011, 11:27:31 AM
Hi buntone,

As a work around:

If you have two Cisco cables and a RJ45 'Balun' you can connect the two Cisco cables together and then you should be able to connect from your laptop to the switch console.  That is what I use  ;D

CheerZ
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 11:33:38 AM
@Flinstone
Do you know the pinout for the Cisco Cables. I have 2 RJ45-DB9 connectors and I can adjust the pinouts to match.

@Dominik
Does resetting the switch cause it to go through the boot cycle and does network traffic going through it get dropped during the reset?
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Dominik on June 15, 2011, 11:38:26 AM
If you reset your ERS5510 it will boot and all traffic will be stopped for a few minutes until it has booted.

So this is a offtime job.
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Flintstone on June 15, 2011, 11:46:26 AM
Hi buntone,

I believe the Cisco console cable pinouts are:

Pin         Signal           Input/Output

1             
2               DTR              Output
3               TxD              Output
4               GnD       
5               GnD
6               RxD              Input
7               DSR              Input
8

CheerZ and good luck
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Dominik on June 15, 2011, 11:54:17 AM
@Flinstone

if you buy a Juniper device you get a very cool RJ45 - DB9 adapter.
I really like these adapters, in fact you don΄t have to carry an extra console cable in your bag, you can simple use your standard patchcord.

Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 11:57:55 AM
@Dominik
Do you know the pinout for the adapters?
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Paul L on June 15, 2011, 01:25:56 PM
from experience I only have good success with the OEM Nortel Console Cables. 

as well, what are you using as a hyperterm client?   I would strongly recommend using TeraTermPro.  you can google for TTpro313, it was the last "Free" version.
puTTY is also very good. 
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: semert on June 15, 2011, 01:36:39 PM
For the Avaya ERS and other devices, I normally use DB-9 to RJ-45 adapters on each end (unless of course the console port of the device is an RJ45, then I just use the correct RJ45 to DB9 at my PC com port.

PC Connector
DB9 (Female) to RJ45

RJ45 ------------> DB 9 (Female)

1 – Blue ----------- Pin 1
2 – Orange --------- Pin 2
3 – Black ---------- Pin 3
4 – Red   ------------ Pin 4
5 – Green ---------- Pin 5
6 – Yellow --------- Pin 6
7 – Brown ---------- Pin 7
8 – White ---------- Pin 8
    (or Gray)          
9 – n/c              Pin 9 - Open


ERS 2500–4500–5500–5600 and older BayStack 350/450/460/470/BPS 2000
Straight Through – 1 to 1, 2 to 2, etc., until 8 to 8.  No connect on 9.  Female end.
(same connector as PC connector)

ERS 8300/8600/8800 
DB9 pin   RJ45 pin
1 -----   n/c
2 -----   3
3 -----   2
4 -----   6
5 -----   5
6 -----   4
7 -----   8
8 -----   7
9   n/c
Female DB9 End.

Notes:
The ERS 2500/4500/5000 switches actually only use pins 2,3 and 5 (TD, RD, Gnd) so if you'd like you can simplify this connector to those three pins only.
You can also use the same connector as the 2500/4500/5000 adapter, if you flip the 8800's DCE/DTE switch next to the console.


Avaya Secure Router Connector
(Note – this is the same pinout for a Cisco console connector.)
RJ45 plugs directly into router, DB9 is the PC end.

DB9 Female to RJ45

RJ45 ---------- DB 9

1 – Blue ------ Pin 8
2 – Orange ---- Pin 6
3 – Black ----- Pin 2
4 – Red   ------- Pin 5 Tie Green and Red from RJ45 (RJ45 pins 4 and 5) together at DB9 pin 5
5 – Green ----- Pin 5 note above - DB9 pin 5 has both RJ45 4 and 5 on it
6 – Yellow ---- Pin 3
7 – Brown ----- Pin 4
8 – White ----- Pin 7
9 – n/c         Pin 9 - Open

New switches coming from Avaya this fall and beyond will use RJ45 console ports, and reportedly will use the same pinout as the Secure Router and as Cisco.

I've been using HyperTerm PE with good results.  I know a lot of people who use TeraTerm and SecureCRT as well, and those appear to work well with Avaya console ports.
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: semert on June 15, 2011, 01:41:13 PM
@Dominik
Does resetting the switch cause it to go through the boot cycle and does network traffic going through it get dropped during the reset?
Yes, resetting the switch causes it to reboot.  That's actually the command normally used to tell it to reboot.  Traffic definitely is affected (dropped) while the switch is rebooting.
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 02:08:15 PM
Got it finally. Used the pinout in the manuals to make my own cable. This next question is kinda unrelated but... Does anyone know if it is possible to add a non Nortel Switch into the stack?
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Flintstone on June 15, 2011, 02:34:50 PM
Hi,

Glad you got your console sorted.

The best way to add a non Nortel switch to a stack is to create an 802.1Q trunk using two or more ports in an MLT trunk and use Etherchannel if the other switch for example is a Cisco switch?

CheerZ and good luck
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 02:50:35 PM
The other switch is a Dell powerconnect 6248, if that helps.
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: semert on June 15, 2011, 02:55:34 PM
Dell also support 802.1Q VLAN tagging.  I believe it also supports LACP link aggregation groups.

You can only "stack" within the product family (4500 to 4500, 5500 or 5600 to 5500, etc.).  You can't stack between product families nor between vendors.  Stacking implies that you are extending a connection between switches to essentially make them act as a single switch, just spread out across multiple boxes.

But as pointed out, you can connect them.  Use a high speed link (gig copper, 10Gig copper or fiber if appropriate) and extend the VLANs between them via 802.1Q VLAN Tagging.  If you want more bandwidth between the Dell and the Avaya switch, create a LACP LAG and trunk multiple ports together for more aggregate bandwidth.
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: buntone on June 15, 2011, 04:15:39 PM
Sorry, I am new to this stuff. I am an intern at the company and they just checked this on me to do. We are trying to get more bandwith between the server racks and one of the racks is using a Dell Powerconnect 6248 switch and the other racks all have Nortel 5510-48T switches. Could you maybe point me to documents on how to do this or explain in more detail? Thanks.
Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: Michael McNamara on June 15, 2011, 06:35:42 PM
This isn't something you should just "take on" unless you have a testlab or your willing to experiment with your production network. You can easily take down the whole network.

With that said you can find an example of how to trunk an Avaya Ethernet Routing Switch and a Cisco Catalyst here;
http://blog.michaelfmcnamara.com/2011/01/802-1q-vlan-tagging-on-a-cisco-catalyst-3750-e/ (http://blog.michaelfmcnamara.com/2011/01/802-1q-vlan-tagging-on-a-cisco-catalyst-3750-e/)

I the link is 1000Mbps I would strongly suggest you examine the port statistics to determine if you really need additional bandwidth and that your limiter isn't somewhere else.

Good Luck!
Title: Re: Connecting via Console - my solution
Post by: notanic on September 15, 2015, 11:24:30 PM
Hi,

I had this same problem, so I just wanted to document my solution.

The problem is that for some reason Nortel switches want a 'straight through' connection not a rollover.
Standard Cisco console cable is a rollover.

What it needs is a straight through cable.

The difference:
google = rollover cable pinout
google = straight through cable pinout

Anyway what I did is:

Connect a standard USB to serial adapter to a DB9 to RJ45 adapter, then a standard Ethernet patch cable, then another DB9 to RJ45 adapter then plugged into the Nortel console port.

If I didn't have the DB9 to RJ45 adapter, I would have just cut open a rollover cable and connect the wires in a straight  through way, i.e pin 1 connect to pin 9 etc.

Hope google finds this.

Picture attached.

Chris







Title: Re: Connecting via Console
Post by: TankII on September 21, 2015, 09:22:49 AM
FYI, Brocade TI and FCX cables work fine on Avaya.
TankII